October 6, 2022
this.addIframe())}static addPrefetch(e,t,i){const a=document.createElement("link");a.rel=e,a.href=t,i&&(a.as=i),document.head.append(a)}static warmConnections(){LiteYTEmbed.preconnected||(LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://www.youtube-nocookie.com"),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://www.google.com"),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://googleads.g.doubleclick.net"),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://static.doubleclick.net"),LiteYTEmbed.preconnected=!0)}addIframe(){const e=new URLSearchParams(this.getAttribute("params")||[]);e.append("autoplay","1");const t=document.createElement("iframe");t.width=560,t.height=315,t.title=this.playLabel,t.allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture",t.allowFullscreen=!0,t.src=`https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/${encodeURIComponent(this.videoId)}?${e.toString()}`,this.append(t),this.classList.add("lyt-activated"),this.querySelector("iframe").focus()}}customElements.define("lite-youtube",LiteYTEmbed);]]> Ever notice how your old gadgets have turned an ugly yellow color since you bought them? Old Macs, Commodores, Nintendo systems, and other machines look dreadful 30 years later—but there is a way to brighten them up again. Why Old Plastic Turns Yellow (and How…

this.addIframe())}static addPrefetch(e,t,i){const a=document.createElement(“link”);a.rel=e,a.href=t,i&&(a.as=i),document.head.append(a)}static warmConnections(){LiteYTEmbed.preconnected||(LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch(“preconnect”,”https://www.youtube-nocookie.com”),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch(“preconnect”,”https://www.google.com”),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch(“preconnect”,”https://googleads.g.doubleclick.net”),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch(“preconnect”,”https://static.doubleclick.net”),LiteYTEmbed.preconnected=!0)}addIframe(){const e=new URLSearchParams(this.getAttribute(“params”)||[]);e.append(“autoplay”,”1″);const t=document.createElement(“iframe”);t.width=560,t.height=315,t.title=this.playLabel,t.allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture”,t.allowFullscreen=!0,t.src=`https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/${encodeURIComponent(this.videoId)}?${e.toString()}`,this.append(t),this.classList.add(“lyt-activated”),this.querySelector(“iframe”).focus()}}customElements.define(“lite-youtube”,LiteYTEmbed);]]>[]

[]Ever notice how your old gadgets have turned an ugly yellow color since you bought them? Old Macs, Commodores, Nintendo systems, and other machines look dreadful 30 years later—but there is a way to brighten them up again.

Why Old Plastic Turns Yellow (and How You Can Make It White Again)

[]This yellowing happens thanks to a flame retardant called bromine in those old ABS plastics. When exposed to UV light, those bromine molecules can destabilize and leech through to the surface, causing the plastic to turn yellow (or even brown if left long enough). Modern plastics have improved the chemistry so this process doesn’t happen, but those old machines from the 80s aren’t so lucky.

[]Different retro machines will yellow at different rates than others, even from the same line of products. Your Super Nintendo may be much yellower than your friend’s, just because they were from different batches of plastic. Here’s what’s even weirder: sometimes, two pieces of plastic in the same machine can be different levels of yellow. The Super Nintendo we’ll be using as our example today, seen below, has a…

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