January 28, 2023
fatmawati achmad zaenuri/Shutterstock.com To find the process ID of a Linux process, use the pidof command, like this: "pidof examplename". If you only know part of the PID name, you can use "pgrep examplenamefragment" instead. Replace "examplename" and "examplenamefragment" with the terms you want to search for.Working with a Linux process often means knowing its…

fatmawati achmad zaenuri/Shutterstock.com

To find the process ID of a Linux process, use the pidof command, like this: “pidof examplename”. If you only know part of the PID name, you can use “pgrep examplenamefragment” instead. Replace “examplename” and “examplenamefragment” with the terms you want to search for.

Working with a Linux process often means knowing its process ID, or PID. It’s a unique number given to each piece of running software. Here are two ways to find out what it is.

What Is a Linux Process ID?

Internally, Linux keeps track of its running process by allocating them a unique ID number, called the process ID, or PID. Every running application, utility, and daemon has a PID.

PIDs are simple integer values. A newly-started process will receive a PID one higher than the last PID that was issued. So the process with the highest PID is the newest—that is, most recently—launched process. That carries on until the system hits the maximum value for a PID.

The upper limit for a PID is 32768. Once that figure is reached, Linux goes back to the start and looks for…

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