February 1, 2023
Intel Intel confirmed last year that it would retire its long-running Pentium and Celeron names, which had been reduced to branding for budget processors. Now the first N-Series chips for budget PCs have arrived, during CES 2023. Intel has revealed its new line of N-series processors, which will be sold under the Core i3 name…

Intel

Intel confirmed last year that it would retire its long-running Pentium and Celeron names, which had been reduced to branding for budget processors. Now the first N-Series chips for budget PCs have arrived, during CES 2023.

Intel has revealed its new line of N-series processors, which will be sold under the Core i3 name and “Intel Processor” — not confusing at all. They’re based on the split-core design we’ve seen in some mobile Core i5 and Core i7 chips, with some faster “P-cores” paired with slower and more power-efficient “E-cores.” On Intel’s other chips, applications and system processes are moved across cores as needed to improve battery life, like most ARM chips found in smartphones and tablets. However, none of Intel’s N-series chips have P-cores — only the slower, but more battery-friendly, E-cores.

Intel

Intel says all the CPUs can accept DDR4, DDR5, or LPDDR5 memory, making them more flexible to use across different PC categories. They also support AV1 hardware decoding, which will come in handy with video streaming, as well as Wi-Fi 6E and Bluetooth 5.2…

Read Full Article Source