October 6, 2022
this.addIframe())}static addPrefetch(e,t,i){const a=document.createElement("link");a.rel=e,a.href=t,i&&(a.as=i),document.head.append(a)}static warmConnections(){LiteYTEmbed.preconnected||(LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://www.youtube-nocookie.com"),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://www.google.com"),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://googleads.g.doubleclick.net"),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://static.doubleclick.net"),LiteYTEmbed.preconnected=!0)}addIframe(){const e=new URLSearchParams(this.getAttribute("params")||[]);e.append("autoplay","1");const t=document.createElement("iframe");t.width=560,t.height=315,t.title=this.playLabel,t.allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture",t.allowFullscreen=!0,t.src=`https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/${encodeURIComponent(this.videoId)}?${e.toString()}`,this.append(t),this.classList.add("lyt-activated"),this.querySelector("iframe").focus()}}customElements.define("lite-youtube",LiteYTEmbed);]]>SvedOliver/Shutterstock.com Cryptocurrency prices can be volatile, and changes in cryptocurrency mining processes and efficiency often lead to shakeups in the GPU hardware market. So when used GPUs heavily used by miners flood the used market, are they safe to buy for home use? Broadly speaking, the…

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Cryptocurrency prices can be volatile, and changes in cryptocurrency mining processes and efficiency often lead to shakeups in the GPU hardware market. So when used GPUs heavily used by miners flood the used market, are they safe to buy for home use?

Broadly speaking, the answer is “yes.” While buying secondhand graphics cards from Bitcoin miners carries a few inherent risks, they’re not really greater than the risks of buying used parts in the first place. Let’s break it down.

Update, 9/16/22: We originally published this piece in 2018. It’s especially relevant once again in 2022, particularly after the Ethereum merge.

A GPU Is Not a Car

It’s tempting to think of electronic components as having a shelf life, and that after a certain amount of use it’s dangerous to keep them without replacement. But that’s not really true—old electronics can work for decades without issue, as long as they don’t have moving parts and aren’t exposed to extreme conditions outside of their operating standards. For example, I used to drive trains…

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