September 26, 2022
this.addIframe())}static addPrefetch(e,t,i){const a=document.createElement("link");a.rel=e,a.href=t,i&&(a.as=i),document.head.append(a)}static warmConnections(){LiteYTEmbed.preconnected||(LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://www.youtube-nocookie.com"),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://www.google.com"),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://googleads.g.doubleclick.net"),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://static.doubleclick.net"),LiteYTEmbed.preconnected=!0)}addIframe(){const e=new URLSearchParams(this.getAttribute("params")||[]);e.append("autoplay","1");const t=document.createElement("iframe");t.width=560,t.height=315,t.title=this.playLabel,t.allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture",t.allowFullscreen=!0,t.src=`https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/${encodeURIComponent(this.videoId)}?${e.toString()}`,this.append(t),this.classList.add("lyt-activated"),this.querySelector("iframe").focus()}}customElements.define("lite-youtube",LiteYTEmbed);]]>Ridgway et al., PLOS One The U.S. Navy’s marine mammal program started in the 1960s and is still going strong. The department has specially trained dolphins that identify undersea mines, defend the waters, and even protect some of the U.S. nuclear reserves. Now, researchers are strapping…

this.addIframe())}static addPrefetch(e,t,i){const a=document.createElement(“link”);a.rel=e,a.href=t,i&&(a.as=i),document.head.append(a)}static warmConnections(){LiteYTEmbed.preconnected||(LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch(“preconnect”,”https://www.youtube-nocookie.com”),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch(“preconnect”,”https://www.google.com”),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch(“preconnect”,”https://googleads.g.doubleclick.net”),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch(“preconnect”,”https://static.doubleclick.net”),LiteYTEmbed.preconnected=!0)}addIframe(){const e=new URLSearchParams(this.getAttribute(“params”)||[]);e.append(“autoplay”,”1″);const t=document.createElement(“iframe”);t.width=560,t.height=315,t.title=this.playLabel,t.allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture”,t.allowFullscreen=!0,t.src=`https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/${encodeURIComponent(this.videoId)}?${e.toString()}`,this.append(t),this.classList.add(“lyt-activated”),this.querySelector(“iframe”).focus()}}customElements.define(“lite-youtube”,LiteYTEmbed);]]>[]Ridgway et al., PLOS One

The U.S. Navy’s marine mammal program started in the 1960s and is still going strong. The department has specially trained dolphins that identify undersea mines, defend the waters, and even protect some of the U.S. nuclear reserves. Now, researchers are strapping cameras to those dolphins to gather insight.

Seriously, if U.S. Navy dolphins didn’t sound wild enough, now a team of researchers put cameras on their backs and managed to capture some truly amazing footage. Six bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were free to roam the San Diego Bay off the coast of California for six months. The cameras captured unique footage, crazy audio, and dolphin noises while gathering new information about how these mammals hunt.

The team’s research showcases the dolphins flying through the water at incredible speeds, hunting, making cute squealing noises, and their hunting methods are published in PLOS One.

The dolphins caught and ate over 200 fish and sea snakes throughout the six-month experiment. Some footage gives researchers new insight into what the mammals will actually eat. And today,…

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