September 26, 2022
this.addIframe())}static addPrefetch(e,t,i){const a=document.createElement("link");a.rel=e,a.href=t,i&&(a.as=i),document.head.append(a)}static warmConnections(){LiteYTEmbed.preconnected||(LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://www.youtube-nocookie.com"),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://www.google.com"),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://googleads.g.doubleclick.net"),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch("preconnect","https://static.doubleclick.net"),LiteYTEmbed.preconnected=!0)}addIframe(){const e=new URLSearchParams(this.getAttribute("params")||[]);e.append("autoplay","1");const t=document.createElement("iframe");t.width=560,t.height=315,t.title=this.playLabel,t.allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture",t.allowFullscreen=!0,t.src=`https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/${encodeURIComponent(this.videoId)}?${e.toString()}`,this.append(t),this.classList.add("lyt-activated"),this.querySelector("iframe").focus()}}customElements.define("lite-youtube",LiteYTEmbed);]]>Casezy idea/Shutterstock.com The internet is down, but you know what to do: unplug your router or modem, wait ten seconds, then plug it back in. It’s second nature at this point, but why does it actually work? And is there some magic to the ten…

this.addIframe())}static addPrefetch(e,t,i){const a=document.createElement(“link”);a.rel=e,a.href=t,i&&(a.as=i),document.head.append(a)}static warmConnections(){LiteYTEmbed.preconnected||(LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch(“preconnect”,”https://www.youtube-nocookie.com”),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch(“preconnect”,”https://www.google.com”),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch(“preconnect”,”https://googleads.g.doubleclick.net”),LiteYTEmbed.addPrefetch(“preconnect”,”https://static.doubleclick.net”),LiteYTEmbed.preconnected=!0)}addIframe(){const e=new URLSearchParams(this.getAttribute(“params”)||[]);e.append(“autoplay”,”1″);const t=document.createElement(“iframe”);t.width=560,t.height=315,t.title=this.playLabel,t.allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture”,t.allowFullscreen=!0,t.src=`https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/${encodeURIComponent(this.videoId)}?${e.toString()}`,this.append(t),this.classList.add(“lyt-activated”),this.querySelector(“iframe”).focus()}}customElements.define(“lite-youtube”,LiteYTEmbed);]]>[]Casezy idea/Shutterstock.com

The internet is down, but you know what to do: unplug your router or modem, wait ten seconds, then plug it back in. It’s second nature at this point, but why does it actually work? And is there some magic to the ten second number?

And the even bigger question: is there some way you can stop doing this?

Routers can feel mysterious, but they’re not. And if you know what’s going wrong, you can usually solve the problem.

Your Router Is a Computer

You might not think of it this way, but your router is a computer. Inside that plastic box is a CPU, memory, and local storage, all running an operating system. And like a computer, things can go wrong from time to time. Maybe a bug is causing a memory leak, maybe the CPU is overheating, or maybe a full-blown kernel panic has taken down the entire system.

What’s the simplest fix for these sorts of computer problems? Turning it on and off again.

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