October 2, 2022
Charoen Krung Photography/Shutterstock Most routers and devices still don’t support Wi-Fi 6E (including the new iPhone 14 series), but the march of progress is still going. Wi-Fi 7 is now closer to reality, as Intel and Broadcom just completed a critical test. Intel and Broadcom announced this week that the two companies completed the first…

Charoen Krung Photography/Shutterstock

Most routers and devices still don’t support Wi-Fi 6E (including the new iPhone 14 series), but the march of progress is still going. Wi-Fi 7 is now closer to reality, as Intel and Broadcom just completed a critical test.

Intel and Broadcom announced this week that the two companies completed the first cross-vendor Wi-Fi 7 demonstration — in other words, the first time Wi-Fi 7 hardware from two different manufacturers could communicate. That’s an important milestone for a wireless standard that needs to work across hardware from many different companies.

The test reportedly reached speeds “greater than 5 gigabits per second,” using a laptop with an Intel Core processor and an unspecified wireless card, connected to a Wi-Fi 7 access point developed by Broadcom. The demonstration comes after MediaTek completed the first live demo of Wi-Fi 7 back in January.

Just like the Wi-Fi 6E standard, Wi-Fi 7 uses a combination of 2.4 GHz, 5 GHz, and 6 GHz spectrum to offer faster speeds. Earlier drafts aimed for a theoretical maximum of 30 Gbps per access point, three times as fast as the maximum 9.6 Gbps for Wi-Fi…

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